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There are shallow rollers, and there are deep rollers. You can’t breed two deep rollers… or their young, their offspring, will roll all the way down… hit and die. Agent Starling is a deep roller, Barney. Let us hope one of her parents was not . – Hannibal Lecter

This is such a great piece of dialogue, I have always wondered whether it is true or not. And whether it applies to “real” rollers as well or only domesticated roller pigeons. Because how would the roller know whether they’re a deep roller or not?

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Clearly lacking basic aviation skills, Mother Nature or God or Fortuna

or whoever made all this stuff at least had a good sense of colour.

Durer thought so too.

And McQueen.


So here we are,  Dreyfus and me, hanging out on youtube (seriously, check out the interior of that tv-studio, it’s mental), trying to figure out if there is any way I can argue that the phenomenological novel is anti-humanist.  Neither youtube nor google offer any assistance, only opposition. But now I’m watching this and thinking maybe it doesn’t matter.

“Hegel is arguing that the reality is merely an a priori adjunct of non-naturalistic ethics, Kant via the categorical imperative is holding that ontologically it exists only in the imagination, and Marx is claiming it was offside.” Brilliant!

Klimt Two Girls with Oleander

“Oleandrin and neriine are two very potent cardiac glycosides (cardenolides) found in all parts of the plant. Red flowered varieties of oleander appear to be more toxic. Oleander remains toxic when dry. A single leaf can be lethal to a child eating it, although mortality is generally very low in humans. The lethal dose of the green oleander leaves for cattle and horses has been found to be 0.005% of the animal’s body weight. The minimum lethal dose of oleander for cattle was found to be 50mg/kg body weight. Horses given 40mg/kg body weight of green oleander leaves via nasogastric tube consistently developed severe gastrointestinal and cardiac toxicosis. Cardiac glycosides that act by inhibiting the cellular membrane sodium-potassium (Na+-K+ ATPase enzyme system) pump with resulting depletion of intracellular potassium and an increase in serum potassium. This results in progressive decrease in electrical conductivity through the heart causing irregular heart activity, and eventual complete block of cardiac activity, and death.”

(From: Colorado State Univeristy)

Another day, another essay.  The weekly structure I once had (if there ever was such a thing) is a fast fading memory. Today is Monday but it could just as well be any other day.  The days seem to blur together, accumulating into a chloroform silhouette that moves slowly towards something we refer to as ‘the end.’ This motion might be an illusion;  there might be no movement at all. I feel I am at a standstill. Hypotheses form a web around my consciousness, isolating it to a timeless interim in a geographical void.  You could also say I’m in the library and I’m bored.

Well, Monday or not, it is International Women’s Day today. Hurray! And yesterday’s Academy Award saw to it so that Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman EVER to win an Oscar for Best Director. Hurray!  And an Oscar to Sandra Bullock (up against Meryl Streep and Helen Mirren)! Hurray! Hurray! I love Sandra Bullock; I think she’s amazing; she just does a lot of films that aren’t so amazing.

style.com

All female solidarity aside…what on heaven’s earth is this woman wearing and why in god’s name has no one steamed it for her? No, not Sandra, she looks divine, the other one (Yes, when you haven’t seen any of the films you are allowed to judge and objectify. And possibly at other times too, as this argument works both ways).